Social Work Department


Social Work Program

In the book of Jeremiah the Children of Israel found themselves surrounded by an alien culture seemingly opposed to their deeply held values and convictions. Forced into exile in Babylon against their wills, they had two choices: withdraw and develop a defensive siege mentality or take action to improve the culture of the place where they had been placed by God.  It was in this context that the Prophet Jeremiah, speaking the words of the Living God, called the Children of Israel to “seek the peace and prosperity of the city to which I have carried you into exile. Pray to the LORD for it, because if it prospers, you too will prosper (Jeremiah 29:11, NIV).”  

How bizarre these words must have sounded to the Israelites!  Amidst what must have felt like debauchery, uprooted from all the touchpoints of their culture and longing for escape back to normality they were being called to anchor themselves and invest for the long term in a hostile place.  Their values and folkways were being assaulted, yet they were being urged to bring peace and prosperity to the homeland of their foes.  It is a lot like the modern dilemma that Christians face everyday.

Social Workers are Shalom seekers.  Taking up the call of Jeremiah we seek the peace and well-being of the places where we have been planted, even when those places assault the values we hold dear.  It is our job to bring the love of Christ to those on the margins of society.  In a very real sense Social Work is ministry and NOBTS seeks to be at the forefront of training a new generation of those seeking the Shalom of damaged places and the hurting people who live there.

The Social Work Program at NOBTS has 3 areas of focus: children, older adults, and community-based ministry.  Our professors bring extensive experience as practitioners to the classroom as they integrate scripture and a Christian worldview into a social work curriculum. We offer the MDiv with a Social Work focus, or the Master of Arts in Church and Community Ministry, and even provide an opportunity to complete the Master of Social Work through a unique dual degree program in conjunction with the University of Southern Mississippi. 

We invite you to explore our programmatic offerings and then encourage you to contact our professors to discuss your future education at NOBTS.

Courses offered Spring 2016:

CCSW6368 Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities (3 hours)
This course is an introduction to social work practice with communities with special attention given to evaluation of community methods of intervention, community study and planning, professional role with community committees and representation, differential aspects of the community organization method, and emerging trends of theory and practice. The church’s role in the community is emphasized.
CCSW6365 Death, Loss, and Grief (3 hours)
The focus in this course is on death, loss, and grief throughout the life span. Attention will be given to basic therapeutic interventions that can be used to assist individuals and groups through a wide variety of loss experiences such as illness, divorce, unemployment, relocation, infertility, and purpose. The role of the minister in the helping relationship will be explored. Lecture, discussion, role playing, and small group components will be utilized.
CCSW6364 Church Community Ministries (3 hours)
A special study is made in the development of weekday programs for churches and faith-based community ministries. Emphasis is placed on discovering community social and spiritual needs and developing programs to meet them.  Attention is given to church and community surveys in addition to supervision and administration of weekday ministries. Also can be taken as MISS5362.
CCSW6380 Social Work Practicum (3 hours)
Students are involved in the practice of social work under supervision for eight hours per week. Experiences of the student vary according to the field placement. Students gain real-world experience in Baptist centers, social service agencies and church settings. This course is limited to students specializing in Social Work. Each student must consult with the professor prior to registering for the practicum. Prerequisite: CESW6360 Introduction to Social Work.
WORKSHOP March 14-18
CCSW6370 Essentials of Helping (3 hours)
This course provides an overview of the helping process including a Biblical and a historical foundation for helping and essential skills for helping. In addition, philosophy, values, and ethics related to helping are explored. Personal issues, including time management, stress, accountability, and healthy relationships will be examined to determine readiness to help.
WORKSHOP May 16-20
CCSW6366 Social Work Practice with Children and Families (3 hours)
This course examines issues related to the welfare of families and children. Topics included are foster care, adoption, institutionalization, domestic violence, and divorce. The role of the church in addressing the issues is discussed. Students will spend eight hours with a child or family.
INTERNET-BASED COURSES
CCSW6360 Introduction to Social Work (3 hours)
The student is introduced to the field of social work and its underlying philosophy and processes. The major divisions of social work – casework, group work, community organization, administration, and research – will be discussed. The challenge to the churches and their responsibility in the community are an integral part of the course.
CCSW6364 Church Community Ministries (3 hours)
A special study is made in the development of weekday programs for churches and faith-based community ministries. Emphasis is placed on discovering social, physical, and needs of a community, and developing programs to meet them. Attention is given to church and community surveys in addition to supervision and administration of weekday ministries. Also can be taken as MISS5362.